Search

Bream Community Library

Tag

library

Bream Reading Club Reviews The Shining by Stephen King

51Kf+jjhR0L._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_Stars out of 5:  3.5

For two of our members this was re-read so they didn’t enjoy as much as they did the first time round. That said we all agreed there were parts so well written you had to stop and just think about them, and other parts that were unnecessary in being over-descriptive and a bit of a waffle.

Discussing the characters:

The Boy: Danny was written as a far more mature character than a real 5 year old would be, since all of us are mothers, that part stood out for all the wrong reasons. Even though his parents acknowledged his maturity, his emotional maturity being that high just wasn’t believable. His perceptions are clear and uncluttered and his emotional development at the end of the book is far more realistic. Danny’s character is way better on his own compared to when he is interacting with his parents.

The Father: Jack’s alcoholism and uncontrolled anger is written exceptionally well, he is a person who doesn’t take responsibility for his actions, he is an addict, and he is selfish and ultimately thinks a great deal more of himself than is healthy. He begins as an angry addict forcing himself to stop and hates how his past keeps getting thrown back in his face. He hates how his wife surreptitiously checks his breath. He hates how people don’t trust him anymore. He wants all the past badness to be erased and trust fully restored. His relationship with his own father offers some explanations for his behaviour and attitudes towards alcoholism, bullying, assault and women. His stay at the hotel takes him down the road to madness and his rage seems to speed him along that path.

The Mother: Wendy is interesting in her psychological dependence on Jack and the thread that runs back to her own mother. She cannot leave Jack because going back to her mother would be ‘worse’. Why could she not stand on her own? She appears to have no other recourse. She is portrayed as conflicted, wishing to keep her family together despite undeniable proof that something is very wrong. She continues to hope unrealistically to achieve some ‘happy family’ somewhere down the line. At the hotel her strength shows far more, and ultimately she protects her son and herself from her maniac of a husband.

The Hero: (In our view) Mr Halloran.  The most well rounded character in the whole book. Wise, funny, practical, kind and courageous, salt of the earth kind of person. He takes Danny under his wing so to speak and makes sure that Danny knows he has a friend he can call on if he gets into trouble.

Discussing the Story:

It is essentially a ‘haunted house’ story. Jack gets hired as the winter caretaker of a long established hotel with a checkered history. He brings his family with him. Danny is psychic and can read surface thoughts, Mr Halloran refers to this as ‘shine’ as he too has this skill though Danny is the strongest one he has ever come across. With Danny’s super perception he sees a whole lot more at that hotel and it is frightening to him. In a short time Jack is being influenced negatively by the malevolent spirits in the hotel which ultimately compel him to murder his own family. The spirits want Danny because of his amazing gift. The story has a happy ending in that Jack’s body is killed by Wendy in self-defence, Mr Halloran arrives just in time to save Danny and Wendy, the hotel blows up because the boiler ‘creeps’ and the malevolent spirit is torn free of the hotel and is pulled apart by the wind. Wendy and Danny start a new life, where Wendy is standing on her own feet and Mr Halloran is a firm family friend.

The issues:

There are elements that didn’t make sense. There was overstatement, some repetition and too much description. The fright parts were well written, designed to make you startle. There were some areas that had such potential but weren’t explored.

Mr Halloran experiences obstacles his entire trip back to the hotel on his rescue mission. If this stalling was meant to be suspenseful it wasn’t necessary. The nail biting wait for him to get there was already enough. Were the ghosts making it next to impossible for him to get there? Was Danny’s proximity to the ghosts making this possible?

The Unanswerables:

Why were the hedge animals outside the hotel so powerful when the ghosts inside weren’t?

There was a malevolent spirit in the shed where the snow mobiles were kept too, not just at the hotel, so why didn’t the ghosts from the hotel flee to the shed to survive a little longer?

A good read but disappointing in places.

Advertisements

Huge Thank You to the Big Issue for this donation!

The Big Issue has an amazing book give away – all the details can be found of their website. It’s super easy just nominate the charity you want to get some books and submit it.

https://www.bigissue.com/news/big-issue-big-book-giveaway-nominate-group-well-send-books/

We love books and love this initiative! Thank you!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We even got some super popular Older Junior Fiction and Teenage Fiction!

 

 

Book Sale!

Hello Everyone!

 

Save the date 27 October Friday 2pm-4pm – Huge Book Sale hosted by Bream Library.

Poster Image

Amazing news! Bream Community Library wins the David Vaisey Prize!

It was announced on Twitter about a half hour ago that Bream Community Library has won the David Vaisey Prize. I nearly choked on my coffee in my excitement!

Here is one of our volunteers Jim Robertson with the David Vaisey Judge Anne Robinson and  Alan Bennett.

DLnCVVOXcAAt_Ra
From left to right – Anne Robinson, Alan Bennett and Jim Robertson

Bream Community Library was shortlisted for our ‘imaginative initiative to increase the number of children to visit the library.’ According to the David Vaisey website [http://davidvaiseyprize.co.uk/latest-news/] We run a regular LEGO club where children build LEGO projects and gain inspiration from LEGO books which they read with their parents.

Jim Robertson and Craig Tait run the LEGO Build club every Thursday between 5.30pm – 6.30pm at the library. Pic 1

Huge well done to all the volunteers who make Build Club such a success, none of this would have been possible without you!

Thank you David Vaisey for this incredible honour, we are humbled and inspired to do even more!

Bream Reading Club Reviews Lighthousekeeping by Jeanette Winterson

images (1)
Lighthousekeeping by Jeanette Winterson

Total stars out of 5: 3.5

All the members were really entranced with the lyrical language. Once we had started reading we couldn’t put the book down.  We also agreed the beginning of the book was far better than the rest. There was humour, good dialogue, and we could relate to the characters and their story and feel invested in the story of Silver.

Some excellent thoughts from one of our members:

“The book itself is told with multiple stories, the reader has to get used to popping from tale to tale, from old sea legends to the exploits of a bigamous Victorian clergyman and Silver’s own story of a displaced child growing into confused womanhood, with problems if her own.

Another theme that runs parallel to the story telling is that of light and darkness. ‘Darkness is a presence. I learned to see in it…’ (pg20). Silver learns to see thought the figurative darkness of her situation and the real darkness of her surroundings, just as Pew has coped with his blindness.

Stories are also linked to the theme of light ‘…it was soon discovered that every light had a story – no, every light was a story, and the flashes themselves were stories going out over the waves, as markers and guides and comfort and warning.’ (pg41)

Silver herself makes sense of her own life by telling it as story – Pew told her. ‘…if you can tell yourself like a story, it doesn’t seem so bad.’ (pg27)

Winterson’s prose is an absolute delight and anyone who has lived in close proximity if the sea will understand the rhythmic power of the lighthouse beam, turning, searching, and reaching out to hose seeking safe harbour.”

When the lighthouse was earmarked for automation it was like Silver was cast adrift and you could feel it in the vagueness of her story from then on. Not having the lighthouse as her anchor she didn’t know how to interact with the ‘normal’ world. Silver appears to be amoral, she does things that are ‘wrong’ but she simply doesn’t see it that way. Stealing a parrot and stalking a librarian. She spends some time in a mental institution thought we are not giving details as to what the doctors actually thought was troubling her, or how long she spent there.

I personally didn’t like the part about the librarian not being entirely helpful to Silver, even though all she wanted was to read a book. Silver didn’t feel welcomed in the library and I felt outraged on her behalf. The conclusion of Silver’s story takes her back to the lighthouse where she essentially breaks in to recapture her past or find some closure as her life has been ‘all over the place’ since she left the security of the lighthouse.

#GetOnlineWeek #try1thing

2 -8 October is Get Online Week. Come to the library and we will help you Get Online!

 

Photo 25-09-2017, 11 44 03

Summer Reading Challenge Prize Giving with Shoo Rayner

The weather played along nicely and we were able to enjoy it outside in the library garden. Shoo Rayner drew pictures, read from one of his books, entertaining the kids wonderfully. Then it was straight into presenting the Completers certificates and medals. A lovely afternoon was had by all. A massive thank you to Shoo Rayner for making it such a success!

Prizegiving. Shoo Rayner Full poster

Test your Super Senses!

Fun was had by all trying out the puzzles. Using their sight with optical illusions, hearing with different sounds and a smell test!

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑